CFP


Calls for papers – Appels à communication/publication

A reminder of the upcoming deadline for proposed papers and panels

CFP FOR VI2019 CONFERENCE IN CHARLESTON, SC

The Victorians Institute is pleased to announce its 2019 conference and welcome abstracts on the topic of

TRANSATLANTIC CONNECTIONS:
AFRICA, THE CARIBBEAN, THE AMERICAS, & VICTORIAN STUDIES

To be held October 31 – November 2, 2019 in Charleston, SC. Our conference site affords an opportunity to think about transatlantic connections in the 19th century when Charleston was a prominent intersection on a web that connected Britain, Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas.

We hope our conference will foster thinking about the many and various ways that Victorian literature and culture engages the Atlantic World. We invite essays and panels that investigate the diverse possibilities of our theme and, in keeping with it, encourage work that draws connections across the spaces that divide academic disciplines. Topics may include:

  • Emigration & Immigration
  • Slavery Abroad & at Home
  • Hybrid Languages, Cultures, & Peoples
  • Economic Affiliations & Rivalries
  • Culinary Connections
  • Ecologies, Climates, & Storms
  • Treasure Islands & Dark Continents
  • Pen Pals, Alliances, & Friendships
  • Travel Narratives
  • Romanticizing the Past
  • Envisioning the Future
  • Colonial Affairs
  • Technologies of Travel & Communication
  • Exploration & Adventure
  • Diasporas & Expatriates
  • The Body: Diseases, Infections & Antidotes
  • Copyrights & Piracy
  • Grand Tours & Lecture Tours
  • Victorians in Charleston
  • Trade Routes, Raw Materials, & Cash Crops

To apply, please submit a 250-300 word abstract of your paper. To propose a panel, please supply an abstract for each paper as well as a short description of the panel. Send all applications and questions to thevictoriansinstitute@gmail.com. Abstracts must be received by June 1st, 2019.


“ILLUSTRATION AND ADAPTATION”

International conference organised by TIL and ILLUSTR4TIOUniversity of Burgundy, 10 & 11 October 2019Keynote speakers: Kamilla Elliott (Lancaster University, UK), Dave McKean (UK) and Kate Newell (Savannah College of Art and Design, USA)

Working languages: English and French –
Deadline for proposals: 1 March, 2019

Illustr4tio’s forthcoming bilingual international conference will deal with the relationship between illustration and adaptation. It aims to allow specialists from different disciplines to compare and exchange on practice, methodology, and theoretical frameworks. Indeed, several fields co-exist without necessarily acknowledging advances in their respective domains. If illustration is a legitimate object of study within intermedial studies (Gabriele Rippl, ed., A Handbook of Intermediality, De Gruyter Mouton, 2015), there are few works that investigate the status of illustration as adaptation, with the exception of works like Kamilla Elliot’s Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate (Cambridge UP, 2003) and Kate Newell’s Expanding Adaptation: From Illustration to Novelization (Palgrave, 2017).

More generally, the conceptualisation of illustration introduces questions about the relationship between adaptation and intermediality. It can serve as a starting point for the intersection of the two domains, something Lars Elleström calls for in his essay “Adaptation and Intermediality” (Thomas Leitch, ed., The Oxford Handbook of Adaptation Studies, Oxford UP, 2017).

We invite specialists and practitioners of illustration, adaptation and intermediality to address the theoretical and epistemological links between their respective objects of study. Papers can make use of recent work on these domains and can deal with the English-speaking world, from the Modern to the Contemporary period, as well as other cultures. We encourage participants to reflect on the following themes and questions in this non-exhaustive list:

  • Illustration as a form of adaptation: can the example of illustration as an intermedial practice participate in redefining what we mean by adaptation? Conversely, can adaptation theory help reappraise illustration as a subject matter and a field of research?
  • Intersections between the realms of illustration and adaptation: what are the boundaries of the field of illustration? In the wake of Henry Jenkins’s works, how can one theorize the convergence between illustration and adaptation?
  • Transmediation between illustration and other media (texts, painting, graphic novels, comics, video games, theatre, film, television series, documentaries, advertising, etc.): theoretical approaches and artistic practices.
  • Professionalisation of illustrators: what approach to adaptation do illustrators have? How to their briefs or commissions impact the perception of illustration / adaptation? What is the role of art school curriculae in this phenomenon?

Proposals of 500-word total (in French or in English) accompanied by a brief biography (100-150 words) should be sent by March 1, 2019 to Sophie Aymes (sophie.aymes@u-bourgogne.fr) and Shannon Wells-Lassagne (shannon.wells-lassagne@u-bourgogne.fr).

A volume of selected papers will be published.

Scientific committee: Sophie Aymes (Université de Bourgogne, France), Nathalie Collé (Université de Lorraine, France), Brigitte Friant-Kessler (Université de Valenciennes, France), Xavier Giudicelli (Université de Reims, France), Christina Ionescu (Mount Allison University, Canada), Maxime Leroy (Université de Haute Alsace, France), Ann Lewis (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), Gabriele Rippl (University of Bern, Switzerland), Shannon Wells-Lassagne (Université de Bourgogne, France).

Organising committee: EA 4182 TIL, Texte Image Langage, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, EA 4343 CALHISTE, Cultures, Arts, Littératures, Histoire, Imaginaires, Sociétés, Territoires, Environnement, Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut-Cambrésis, EA 2338 IDEA, Interdisciplinarité Dans les Études Anglophones, Université de Lorraine, EA 4363 ILLE, Institut de recherche en Langues et Littératures Européennes, Université de Haute Alsace.

______________________________________________________________________

Call for Articles “Dear Child”:Talking to Children in Victorian and Edwardian Children’s Books To be published in Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens 92 (autumn 2020) https://journals.openedition.org/cve/

Read the call for articles here.

Deadline: February 15, 2019

——————————————————————————————————

Dans le cadre du prochain congrès de la S.A.E.S. qui se tiendra les 6, 7 et 8 juin 2019 à l’Université d’Aix-en-Provence, l’atelier de la Société Française d’Etudes Victoriennes et Edouardiennes (SFEVE) accueillera vos propositions de communications sur le thème retenu, à savoir « L’exception ».

Vous pourrez retrouver le texte de cadrage sur le site du congrès de la SAES 2019:
http://saesfrance.org/congres-annuel-de-la-saes-2019-aix/

Merci de bien vouloir envoyer vos propositions de communication (en anglais ou en français) ainsi qu’une brève notice biographique à :

Fabienne Moine (fabienne.moine@wanadoo.fr) et Laurence Roussillon-Constanty (laurence.roussillon-constanty@univ-pau.fr)
La date limite pour l’envoi est fixée au 1er novembre 2018.


Call for papers–Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens 90 (autumn 2019) – up to January 2019

“Epistemocriticism of Victorian and Edwardian Literature”

For CFP in French, click here.

Issue number 90 of Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens (http://journals.openedition.org/cve) will be entitled “Epistemocriticism of Victorian and Edwardian Literature” and will be published in the autumn of 2019. It is meant as a tribute to Annie Escuret who was professor at Université Paul Valéry–Montpellier 3 for many years and the director of this journal from 1997 to 2013, and it will also stand as a continuation of issue 46, “H. G. Wells : Science & Fiction in the 19th century”, which was edited by Annie Escuret in October 1997, when she took up the direction of the journal and brought it to its renowned standard.

That issue proposed the then innovative approach of epistemocriticism: Eliot, Dickens, Meredith, Hardy and Wells were studied in the light of her favourite contemporary French theorists—Michel Serres, Henri Atlan, Michel Foucault, Michel Pierssens, Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers—as well as that of Anglophone scholars, such as Gillian Beer (Darwin’s Plots), Sally Shuttleworth (George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Science), George Levine (Darwin and the Novelists), Gerard Holston (Thematic Origin of Scientific Thought : Kepler to Einstein), or Peter Morton (The Vital Science : Biology and the Literary Imagination). It was thus that issue 46 meant to capture the relationships between science and fiction and more generally the encounters between oeuvres and knowledge. Such encounters are at the core of the epistemocritic perspective which consists in analyzing the uses a text makes of scientific knowledge and how it in turn produces knowledge itself. Indeed, more than any other period in human history, the 19th century witnessed the extensive development of science and literature, with the growth of the realist / naturalist novel, but also the advent and rapidly growing hegemony of a vast number of sciences and a new episteme.

Sciences are certainly many and varied, and to the well-known and established sciences, the 19th century added some of the most illustrious – or notorious – pseudo-sciences, namely J. K. Lavater’s physiognomony, Franz Josef Gall’s phrenology, Cesare Lombroso’s criminal anthropology, as well as graphology, pathognomy, craniology, which were often used to dubious ends. However, this was also a century which most particularly witnessed much more seriously-oriented scientific developments, such as those of economics, thermology, thermodynamics, cosmology, physics, chemistry, electricity, magnetism, geology, biology, psychology, sociology, medicine, heredity, evolutionism, determinism, eugenics, physiology. The 19th century can boast the advent of sciences concerned with the living world, a potentially fertile connecting ground between sciences and literature. Thanks to widespread theories of the living world, cultural representations of living organisms diffused widely and influenced historical, political and social thinkers; simple analogies, such as grafting, invention, cross-breeding are just as many scientific concepts that found their way into the literary works of Victorian and Edwardian authors, who were both witnesses and actors in this most fertile period.

Please send your proposals to Luc Bouvard by January 15th, 2019 at the latest.

luc.bouvard@univ-montp3.fr

Your article may be in French or in English. Please abide by the « instructions to authors » posted on the CVE website at the following address.

https://journals.openedition.org/cve/157 for articles written in French.

https://journals.openedition.org/cve/158 for articles written in English.